Kraft Caramels

        Kraft Caramels are one of those products that transcends the definition of candy. Like chocolate chips, they're also an ingredient in countless recipes. I'm more likely to see these bags in the baking aisle of the grocery store than the candy section. Kraft Caramels were introduced in 1933, the same year Kraft brought Miracle Whip into people's lives. In a strange twist, Kraft decided to sell their industry-standard caramels and spun them off with a few other brands to a new company called Favorite Brands. They made the caramels with the Kraft name for two years under the agreement, but after that they rolled them into their other candy brand, Farley's and called them Farley's Original Chewy Caramels. Well, I don't know if you remember those years of not being able to find Kraft Caramels ... I'm not sure how brand aware I was at that time, but I think I considered myself confused and ended up buying Brach's Caramels. Kraft got their caramels back in 2000 and I think they learned their lesson.
        The caramels are packaged simply and perfectly. Each cube is wrapped in clear cellophane, like little gifts with the surprise spoiled with the transparent packaging. The color is beautiful and mine were fresh, slightly soft and glossy. They smells sweet, like vanilla pudding. The bite is soft and easy, but not a stringy chew. It's also not quite a fudge texture. This style of caramel is called a short caramel, the sugar and milk is completely emulsified so there are no sugar crystals. The sugar is caramelize, so it has a light toffee note to it along with the mellow dairy flavors of the milk.
        The chew is interesting and flavorful, but lacks a bit of the stickiness that I desire in a caramel. I like a complex flavor and silkier texture. They're sweet but at least have a salty note to balance that out. They stick in my teeth a bit, but don't bind my molars together like some stale Sugar Babies can do. The ingredients are decent enough for cheap candy: corn syrup, sugar, skim milk, palm oil, whey, salt, artificial flavor and soy lecithin. I understand that one of the benefits to this style though is its versatility for recipes. They can be melted and added to other ingredients like swirled into brownies, drizzled on popcorn and of course their most popular use - caramel dipped apples. There are 32 calories in each caramel cube and they're still made in the U.S.A. Kosher.